Ideas for Tomorrow - 2013


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Any plausible pathway to sustainable development must involve the state

An article by Chandran Nair on The Guardian - Any plausible pathway to sustainable development must involve the state. States cannot abdicate responsibility and rely on the private sector to lead sustainability; their choices will be the central narrative of 21st century.

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Technology and innovation: the top five stories from Guardian in 2013

Technology may be changing the world, but is it always for the better? Much of our most popular content focused on the negative impact of big tech on society - whether it was North Face's Doug Tomkins claiming that technology is destroying the world or Chandran Nair listing the dangers the internet poses to a sustainable world.

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2013: a year of disasters for Asia that we're all to blame for

Typhoon Haiyan, Indonesian forest fires, Rana Plaza - 2013 has not been good for Asia. Unless the growth-at-any price economic model is challenged we can expect more of the same.

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Asian farmers deserve decent living wage

In mainstream global business terms, competitive advantage means externalising costs and underpricing agricultural inputs, often using cheap labour and thus exposing food supply chains to unethical and dangerous practices.

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Distorted view of China overlooks its many positive achievements

Chandran Nair says that while China has its fair share of problems like any other large nation, biased coverage by the Western media gives the impression it has no redeeming qualities

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Can Asia have more cars?

In 2050 the Earth will be home to nine billion people – most of whom will be Asian. What would happen if everyone in Asia reached the same standard of living as the west? Chandran Nair gives his views on economic models and the need for strict limits on cars in Asia.

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Five dangers the internet poses to a sustainable world

It's time to slay the sacred cow that the internet is a force only for good.

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US and NATO in Afghanistan — An Asian Viewpoint

More than eleven years in, the War in Afghanistan has dragged on into a deepening disaster for the U.S. and its NATO allies. The conflict continues to alienate the citizens of the region and apart from a seemingly arbitrary withdrawal date does not have a meaningful end in sight. Chandran Nair offers a regional perspective — and a plan for peace.

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Questions we must ask about the internet

Chandran Nair poses some important questions we must ask about the internet.

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Reverse the urbanisation policies that empty Asia's countryside

Is urbanisation really an economic panacea for the 60m who become city-dwellers each year? And will it deliver the returns expected across Africa and Asia?